deceive


deceive
deceive, mislead, delude, beguile, betray, double-crossmean to lead astray or into evil or to frustrate by under- handedness or craft.
A person or thing deceives one by leading one to take something false as true, something nonexistent as real, something counterfeit as genuine, something injurious as helpful: the term may imply no more than a chance or inadvertent confusing or it may suggest a deliberate ensnaring or entrapping for the agent's own and often evil ends
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deceived by a chance resemblance into the belief that he had seen his dead sister's spirit

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"No woman's safe with him." "Ah, but he hasn't deceived me, Mrs. Berry. He has not pretended he was good"— Meredith

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a person who first subconsciously deceives himself and then imagines that he is being virtuous and truthful— Russell

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A person or thing misleads one by causing one to follow a wrong path, way, or course or to fall into error
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misled by a confusing traffic signal

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we never find them misled into the conception that such gifts are an end in themselves— Dickinson

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nor is there any safeguard against the nations being misled and deceived by their governments into sanctioning another great warInge

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Thrasyllus never told lies but he loved misleading people—Graves

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A person or thing deludes one by deceiving or misleading one so completely as to make one a fool, a dupe, or so befuddled as to be incapable of distinguishing the false from the true
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I began to wonder whether I, like the spider that chased the shadow, had been deluded, and had seemed to hear a sound that was not a sound— Hudson

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did he, did all the people who said they didn't mind things, know that they really did? Or were they indeed deluded!—Rose Macaulay

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A person or, less often, a thing, beguiles one by using such subtle and usually agreeable or alluring devices as to mislead, deceive, or delude one
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the male propensity to be beguiledMary Austin

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I recalled some of the Indian beliefs, especially that of the . . . man-devouring monster who is said to beguile his victims into the dark forest by mimicking the human voiceHudson

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marsh- lights to beguile mankind from tangible goods and immediate fruitions— Mumford

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A person or thing betrays one by using deception or treachery to deliver one into the hands of an enemy or put one in a dangerous or false position
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verily I say unto you, that one of you shall betray me— Mt 26:21

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knowing that nature never did betray the heart that loved her— Wordsworth

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so, times past all number deceived by false shows, deceiving we cumber the road of our foes, for this is our virtue: to track and betrayKipling

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A person double-crosses another and usually a friend, partner, or accomplice by deceiving or betraying him, especially by double-dealing or duplicity
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said he had been double-crossed by his partner

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De Valera charged that his own trusted negotiators had double-crossed him by signing an agreement to take the detested oath of loyalty to the British king— Blanshard

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Analogous words: *cheat, cozen, defraud, overreach: outwit, circumvent (see FRUSTRATE): *dupe, gull, befool, trick, hoax, hoodwink, bamboozle
Antonyms: undeceive: enlighten

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Deceive — De*ceive , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Deceived}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Deceiving}.] [OE. deceveir, F. d[ e]cevoir, fr. L. decipere to catch, insnare, deceive; de + capere to take, catch. See {Capable}, and cf. {Deceit}, {Deception}.] 1. To lead into error;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • deceive — de‧ceive [dɪˈsiːv] verb [transitive] to make someone believe something that is not true in order to get what you want: • Postal officials have long deceived the public on how slow mail delivery really is. deceive somebody into something •… …   Financial and business terms

  • deceive — de·ceive vb de·ceived, de·ceiv·ing vt: to cause to accept as true or valid what is false or invalid vi: to practice deceit compare defraud, mislead Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster …   Law dictionary

  • deceive — [dē sēv′, disēv′] vt. deceived, deceiving [ME deceiven < OFr deceveir < L decipere, to ensnare, deceive < de , from + capere, to take: see HAVE] 1. to make (a person) believe what is not true; delude; mislead 2. Archaic to be false to;… …   English World dictionary

  • deceive — c.1300, from O.Fr. decevoir (12c., Mod.Fr. décevoir) to deceive, from L. decipere to ensnare, take in, beguile, cheat, from de from or pejorative + capere to take (see CAPABLE (Cf. capable)). Related: Deceived; deceiver; deceiving …   Etymology dictionary

  • deceive — [v] mislead; be dishonest bamboozle*, beat, beat out of, beguile, betray, bilk, buffalo*, burn, cheat, circumvent, clip, con, cozen, cross up, defraud, delude, disappoint, double cross, dupe, ensnare, entrap, fake, falsify, fleece, fool, gouge,… …   New thesaurus

  • deceive — ► VERB 1) deliberately mislead into believing something false. 2) (of a thing) give a mistaken impression. DERIVATIVES deceiver noun. ORIGIN Old French deceivre, from Latin decipere ensnare, cheat …   English terms dictionary

  • deceive — de|ceive [dıˈsi:v] v [T] [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: deceivre, from Latin decipere] 1.) to make someone believe something that is not true = ↑trick →↑deception ▪ He had been deceived by a young man claiming to be the son of a… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • deceive */ — UK [dɪˈsiːv] / US [dɪˈsɪv] verb [transitive] Word forms deceive : present tense I/you/we/they deceive he/she/it deceives present participle deceiving past tense deceived past participle deceived Metaphor: Deceiving someone is like sending or… …   English dictionary

  • deceive — [[t]dɪsi͟ːv[/t]] deceives, deceiving, deceived 1) VERB If you deceive someone, you make them believe something that is not true, usually in order to get some advantage for yourself. [V n] He has deceived and disillusioned us all... [V n into ing] …   English dictionary


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